Master of Business Administration | Online MBA (2022)

A list of MBA Concentrations is found below. Please consult your student coach/advisor when selecting and declaring your concentration in order to ensure you have planned for its specific prerequisites. You are required to declare your concentration during the first term of your MBA program.

MBA program Concentrations include:

  • Accounting Concentration
  • Acquisition and Contract Management Concentration
  • Business Analytics Concentration
  • Cybersecurity Concentration
  • Entrepreneurship Concentration
  • Executive Coaching Concentration
  • Finance Concentration
  • Global Economic Threat Environment Concentration
  • Healthcare Concentration
  • Human Capital Management Concentration
  • Human Resource Management Concentration
  • Information Security Management Concentration
  • Interdisciplinary Business Concentration
  • Interdisciplinary Concentration
  • International Management Concentration
  • Management Concentration
  • Management Information Systems Concentration
  • Marketing Concentration
  • Professional Communication Concentration
  • Project Management Concentration
  • Supply Chain Management Concentration
  • Tax Concentration

Accounting Concentration

The Accounting Concentration is designed to provide you the opportunity to explore advanced topics in the accounting field. This Concentration alone will not qualify you to sit for the CPA exam. If you are planning to sit for the CPA examination, you should check with your faculty advisor to ensure you will have completed the requirements as outlined by the respective state board of accountancy. You may take the accounting electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the list of accounting courses below and the prerequisites for a course must be met before you can enroll in the course.

This course covers advanced financial accounting topics relevant to professional exams as well as practice. Such topics include: Business combinations and consolidated financial reporting; foreign currency transactions; hedging and related derivatives; partnerships and LLCs; and SEC reporting. Authoritative accounting research is also incorporated. Prerequisite: AC 312

Accounting Theory is a course in basic accounting theory or the “whys” of the current reporting standards. The course reviews the historical development of accounting theory and explores its impact on current accounting practices. Current reporting standards are reviewed regarding the theoretical rational for such and the tie-in to the conceptual framework. Other areas of discussion will include the policy making process, contemporary accounting issues, and some comparisons of U.S. reporting standards to international accounting requirements. Prerequisite: AC 312

This course focuses on the study of current standards of practice in international financial accounting and a comparison of U.S. GAAP to practices in other countries. Emphasis is placed on understanding the importance of convergence of financial reporting and the adoption of international financial reporting standards, the role international accounting standards play in the global market place, and the impact of these standards on U.S. GAAP. The course also covers issues related to management decision-making in the global marketplace including transfer pricing, taxation, strategic planning and control. Prerequisite: AC 312

This course is a continuation of cost accounting and is designed for those interested in gaining a more thorough knowledge of advanced managerial and cost accounting concepts and practices. Topics include current managerial and cost accounting issues such as the balanced scorecard, responsibility accounting, inventory and production management, strategic cost management, capital budgeting, and quality and performance measurement. Prerequisite: AC 321 Cost Accounting or MBA 641

This class covers the creation, formation, and liquidation of C corporations as well as tax practices and ethics as they relate to C corporations. Also covered will be taxation across state lines, business tax credits, and international tax. Prerequisite: AC 331

This course addresses auditing standards and techniques as prescribed by the PCAOB and ASB. Emphasis is placed on internal control, developing audit evidence, evaluating audit risks, and preparing audit reports. Also covered are professional standards, ethics, and legal liability; internal, operational, and compliance auditing; and other assurance services such as reviews, compilations, and agreed-upon procedures. 12 credit hours of accounting including AC 312

This course integrates basic auditing with an advanced application of related concepts and standards. Topics of exploration may include: Audit sampling, ethical dilemmas, professional discipline, fraud detection, special purpose frameworks, and particular assurance engagements, among others. Prerequisite: AC 442

This course examines current concepts in accounting information systems emphasizing the security/control of systems as well as digital forensic information and investigation. Focus is placed on security and control issues from an accounting and auditing perspective along with the related technology issues and the impact on business cycles. The processing of accounting data and the controls necessary to assure accuracy and reliability of data by a responsive accounting system are also emphasized. Technology issues used by auditors and forensic accountants and highlighted by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (i.e. data mining) are an integral part of this course.

This course covers governmental accounting and the various funds associated with non-profit enterprises including a study of accounting techniques as applied to federal and state governmental units, public school systems, colleges and universities, hospitals, voluntary and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations. Students will be expected to prepare basic financial statements for a sample government using a dual-track computerized accounting software package. Prerequisites: AC 312

This course covers special topics of financial accounting, auditing, tax, or managerial accounting. The specific topic(s) offered will be listed in the course schedules for the session during which the seminar is offered. This class is offered in a seminar format, focusing on discussion rather than lecture. Prerequisites: 12 hours of accounting

This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining experience in the workplace. The learning objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with, and should be approved and sponsored by a full-time College of Business Accounting faculty member and the work supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship.

Acquisition and Contract Management Concentration

The Acquisition and Contract Management Concentration enables members of the federal acquisition community and its contracting partners to enhance their acquisition managerial practices. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding the acquisition process, as well as statutory and regulatory requirements.

Note: A Level 2 or Level 3 DAWIA certification for the contracting career field through DAU/FAI may be used to transfer 9 credit hours to the MBA Acquisition and Contract Management Concentration.

You will be required to take the following 9 credit hours:

This course focuses on the pre-award business and contracting knowledge necessary to process complex procurement with an emphasis on the following topics: business relationship, strategic sourcing, risk management, contract financing, subcontracting plans, source selection, and contractor responsibility. Students can apply the knowledge learned to practical exercises involving acquisition planning, source selection, and award of technical support service contracts. Additional topics include service case communication, teaming and leadership, customer analysis, spend analysis, multiple award IDIQ, and formal source selection. Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

This course focuses on the legal considerations in the procurement process with an emphasis on contract law, fiscal law, protests, assignment of claims, subcontracting, dispute and claims, fraud, debt, and terminations. Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

This course focuses on cost analysis and negotiation techniques and topics including cost analysis, quantitative techniques, indirect cost, accounting and est. systems audits, FCCM, profit analysis, and negotiations of acquisition planning, cost analysis, negotiation, and contract administration. Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

Business Analytics Concentration - BAN

Select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This course is designed to provide a foundation of SAS analytics programming concepts and environments. It provides the tools necessary to write SAS programs to perform data management, analysis, and reporting. Topics include creating and documenting data sets, managing and reshaping data, writing reports, computing statistics on data set variables, and performing effective SAS programming. Hands-on exercises designed to facilitate understanding of all the topics are included. The course also provides the basis for more advanced work in data analytics and advanced programming techniques for data management. This course aligns with the SAS Base Programming certification concepts offered through the SAS Institute, Inc. Prerequisite: None

This course offers an in-depth exploration of all the major topics in the field of data and information management from an applied perspective with an emphasis on data warehouses. The course is designed to provide not only a strong theoretical foundation, but also the technical skills required in analyzing, designing, implementing, managing, and utilizing information repositories. Topics covered include relational database model, data modeling, logical and physical database design, structured query language (SQL) implementation, procedures and triggers, data integration and quality, data warehouses and other relevant techniques for addressing big data issues in organizations today. The strategic roles that data and information play in business operations, customer relationship management, business decision-making, and strategy development are also discussed.

This course provides an analytical toolset to address modern, data-intensive business problems. To be effective in a competitive business environment, a business analytics professional needs to be able to use analytical tools to translate information into decisions and to convert information about past performance into reliable forecasts. Using a case-based approach, the course provides an overview of the key concepts, applications, processes and techniques relevant to business analytics. The course makes use of the leading software products to illustrate the use of business analytics methodologies to enhance business decision-making. Prerequisite: None

As business organizations collect more and more data as a byproduct of their operations, decision-makers are beginning to proactively and systematically analyze these data to improve decision quality. This course focuses on topics relevant to data mining, which is the process that uses a variety of data analysis tools to discover patterns and relationships in data that may be used to make proactive, knowledge-driven decisions. The course provides an in-depth discussion on various techniques of data mining including predictive modeling, pattern recognition, prescriptive analytics, and text mining. Both the theoretical and practical aspects of data mining are discussed in this course. Prerequisite: BAN 600.

Cybersecurity Concentration

In today's cyber world, professionals need to understand the methods for preventing, detecting, deterring, and responding to real and potential cyber threats and incidents. The Cybersecurity Concentration provides graduate students with an advanced understanding of the technical aspects of information security. Students successfully completing this coursework will attain knowledge and abilities to operate and manage security technologies. Topic areas include security architecture & design, computer forensics, penetration testing, and information warfare. Students entering this concentration are required to have an established technical background and knowledge level.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This course is designed as an overview of the investigative methods and tools associated with computer forensics. Topics include: processing crime and incident scenes, digital evidence controls, recovery of information, network forensics, data acquisition, and legal and ethical issues associated with investigations.

This course addresses the issues relating to successful information security management. Topics include access control systems, network and software security, management practices, risk management, protection mechanisms, business continuity planning, and legal and ethical issues. The course allows for analysis of current security management models.

This course is designed as an overview of the fundamental processes associated with waging war in an electronic age. Topics include strategic planning and tactical analysis for target identification, reconnaissance, and tool selection. The intent of this course is to focus on individual, corporate and national forms of warfare.

This course focuses on the architecture and security associated with cloud computing. Emphasis in placed on key drivers which lead to cloud computing adoption and issues associated with cloud computing governance. Additional topics will include infrastructure security, identity and access management, cloud services, data security and storage, and auditing and compliance. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental components of security architecture. Topics include computer organization; hardware, software and firmware components; open and distributed systems; and protection mechanisms. Discussion also includes certification and accreditation; formal security models; and evaluation criteria. Assigned projects include designing a model secure system.

This course provides a technical study of offensive and defensive techniques for protecting cyber assets. Topics include security testing, risk mitigation techniques, and threat response. Discussion also includes penetration testing theory, techniques, and tools; network, systems, and application vulnerability scanning; risk analysis and response; and intrusion detection and response. Emphasis is placed on identification of system vulnerabilities and threats and techniques for preventing attacks.

Entrepreneurship Concentration

The Entrepreneurship Concentration is designed to prepare students to design, launch, and grow new business ventures, either stand alone or within an existing corporation, including franchising and outsourcing. High-growth ventures (e.g. technology) as well as socially- oriented ventures are emphasized. Consideration of the international dimensions and sustainability of new ventures are also highlighted.

You will be required to take the following 3 credit hours:

This course is designed to introduce students to the entrepreneurial mindset, including the concepts of innovation and newness. Students evaluate a variety of entrepreneurial activities, including outright ownership, franchising, outsourcing and partnerships. Traits and characteristics of successful entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial teams will be covered along with aligning organizational design with the business goals, strategy and business model, defining key roles, core competency requirements & job specifications, and recruiting and building the team. The final project in this course is the development of a Business Plan for an idea of the student’s choosing. Prerequisites for MSM program only: MSM 500, 510, 520, 610, 620, and 630

A minimum of 6 additional credit hours are required from the courses listed below (or 2 of the 4 courses):

This course will deal with the sources of capital for early stage companies and the implications of the decisions a company makes to fund its operations. It also explores issues in the valuation of ventures and how the achievement of milestones can impact that valuation. Venture capital and angel investors are also covered. Lastly, the course will explore accounting and finance techniques to monitor the success of the enterprise. It will provide the skills and techniques to manage the business by the numbers exploring methods successful entrepreneurs use to understand their costs and cost drivers, break- even point and integrating these into an activity based forecast for their business. Prerequisites for MSM program only: MSM 500, 510, 520, 610, 620, and 630)

This course covers promoting and marketing an entrepreneurial idea from its inception to the marketplace. The course is designed for exploring the unique marketing strategies required to exploit entrepreneurial opportunities. It will also focus is on issues surrounding companies with high growth potential, an interest in sustainability and the creativity needed to develop innovative marketing for these environments. Prerequisites for MSM program only: MSM 500, 510, 520, 610, 620, and 630

This course is centered on the single-person or family business and the issues associated with business transition planning. The course covers development and implementation of strategy for small businesses, and succession planning for the entrepreneur. It also covers valuation issues and timetables for moving profitably out of a business. Prerequisites for MSM program only: MSM 500, 510, 520, 610, 620, and 630

This course is designed for anyone who is charged with managing the day-to-day operation of a small to medium firm. It covers planning, budgeting, payroll issues, business taxation issues and use of tools and techniques to ensure that small business owners can comply with established laws keep accurate records and produce helpful reports for managerial decision-making. Prerequisites for MSM program only: MSM 500, 510, 520, 610, 620, and 630)

Executive Coaching Concentration

The Executive Coaching Concentration will teach the fundamental skills required to coach business leaders and managers. These coaching principles can be applied in a variety of contexts and settings such as business leadership and management. The Concentration provides an overview of the foundational concepts needed to prepare you to actively facilitate the identification, selection, and accomplishment of business goals. The courses are offered online including a weekly one hour telephone conference call. The successful completion of the three courses (MCL 650, MCL 651, and MCL 652) including one credit hour internships (MCL 654, MCL 655, and MCL 656) taken simultaneously with each course will result in a graduate certificate of completion in executive coaching.

External Professional Standards

External Professional Standards: Bellevue University is an institutional member of the Graduate School Alliance for Executive Coaching (GSAEC).

The mission of GSAEC is to establish and maintain standards for education and training provided by academic institutions for the discipline and practice of executive and organizational coaching.

Executive Coaching Courses*

You must complete all three Executive Coaching courses. An Internship course (listed below) must be taken with an Executive Coaching course. Each Executive Coaching course is three credit hours.

This course covers the ethical guidelines for professional coaches and professional practice standards. Topics covered include record keeping, dual relationships, and the current professional context and dynamics of the coaching field. Requirement - Must be taken concurrently with 1 credit hour of either MCL 654, 655, or 656.

This course addresses the academic theories upon which executive coaching is founded. These include the coaching relationship process and associated communication skills. It will also cover various assessment tools utilized in executive coaching. Requirement - Must be taken concurrently with 1 credit hour of either MCL 654, 655, or 656.

This course will cover the role of executive coaches, as well as coaching relationship dynamics. A general model of executive coaching will be introduced and utilized throughout the course. Requirement - Must be taken concurrently with 1 credit hour of either MCL 654, 655, or 656.

Internship Courses*

You must complete all three Internship courses. An Internship course must be taken with an Executive Coaching course (listed above). Each Internship course is one credit hour.

This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining guided executive coaching performance development in the actual workplace. The learning performance objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with and approved by the course instructor and the site supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. Requirement – One credit hour must be taken concurrently with one of these three courses: MCL 650, 651 and 652.

This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining executive coaching skill development experience in the actual workplace. The learning skills objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with and approved by the course instructor and the site supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. Requirement – One credit hour must be taken concurrently with one of these three courses: MCL 650, 651 and 652. Prerequisite: MCL 654.

This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining guided executive coaching competency development experience in the actual workplace. The learning competencies objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with and approved by the course instructor and the site supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. Requirement – One credit hour must be taken concurrently with one of these three courses: MCL 650, 651 and 652.* Prerequisite: MCL 654 and MCL 655.

*For the Executive Coaching Courses and Internships, students will need Internet connectivity, a webcam, and a headset with a microphone.

Finance Concentration

Financial knowledge and understanding is highly valued in the marketplace and the Finance Concentration provides an opportunity for you to further develop your knowledge and practical application skills in several key finance areas. Prior study is not required to pursue the Finance Concentration and you may take any of the finance electives without pursuing the entire Concentration. If you are interested in this Concentration, you should contact a major professor in the MBA area to assist you. You may take the finance electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This courses includes fundamental principles and practices of risk management and insurance with an applied focus on risk management processes rather than institutional and contractual details of the insurance industry. Topics include risk identification; risk characterization; pricing of risk reduction techniques; risk retention; regulatory, legal and tax implications; insurance; and other hedging strategies. Additionally, personal, business, and public policy perspectives concerning life, health, property, and liability risk management and insurance are addressed. Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

Investment principles and practices are studied in the context of individuals and organizations. The course will integrate economic relationships and practices for an understanding of the current investment environment. Additionally, the course will survey the institutions and securities that make up the investment environment to provide students a history of how Wall Street operates. Students should learn to understand and experience how individuals trade financial instruments, including stocks, options, bonds, futures, and other derivative securities. Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

This course will focus on international financial tools, applications, and concepts. Topics include fundamental international financial relationships and their application to firms and individuals, international transactions, tax issues, and multinational corporations. It will cover essential elements of transacting in an international market place. It also will address the fundamental risks inherent in international business and the use of financial securities to hedge these risks. Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

Cash management also may be known as treasury management, working capital management, or short-term financial management, This course addresses fundamental principles and practices concerning cash management. Topics include the role of cash management, credit, accounts receivable and collection management, accounts payable and disbursement management, electronic commerce, information and technology needs for cash management, relevant relationship management, and contemporary issues. Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

Global Economic Threat Environment Concentration

The Global Economic Threat Environment concentration in offers students an opportunity to apply the foundational and theoretical knowledge learned in the MBA core to the global arena in several ways: in comparative perspective across regions along economic, political, and cultural lines; with specific area studies focus in two crucial global regions dealing with issues that are pertinent to the 21st century global economy; and in how strategy, leadership, and power apply and can influence the transnational economic environment.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This course examines an increasingly important aspect of 21st century conflict: green conflict, based on ecological, natural resource and demographic crises. It will assess how changing factors in the environment can alter and impact states and transnational relations. The geopolitics of energy and other natural resources will be a major emphasis of the course.

This course examines hard and soft power as concepts, theories, and consequential implications in global politics. It will estimate the applications of diplomatic and military strength and the proper context and applicability of each in given complex foreign dilemmas.

Examines the complexity of international political economy, its manipulation, misuse, and role in the elevation, continuation, and worsening of conflict around the globe.

This course examines the African continent to expose the implications of democratization, ethnicity, and development. It will analyze various democratization projects occurring throughout the continent; consider the development of African political thought; domestic and party politics within various countries; and consider the complex consequences to war and conflict in Africa today. Finally, theoretical, empirical and philosophical debates about international relations, foreign aid, grassroots activism and radicalism will be investigated, to provide greater depth and subtlety to the more commonly examined issues of economic development.

This course examines Asia from the perspectives of democracy, political economy, and human rights. It will assess how political and economic factors in the region impact not only individual states, but also transnational relations with other regions like North America and the European Union. How the region’s ongoing economic and political transformation influences governance will be examined. How power interplays with other states on issues pertaining to conflict and human rights will be important. Finally, the course will look at all of these issues from a theoretical and philosophical perspective, asking if culture impacts some of the variations.

Healthcare Concentration

The Healthcare Concentration provides the non-healthcare professional graduate student with general healthcare knowledge. The intent of this Concentration is to assist personnel, in areas other than patient care, to understand and be familiar with certain healthcare terminology and requirements. This Concentration is recommended if you work in a field related to the healthcare industry. You may take the healthcare electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You will be required to take the following 9 credit hours:

This course examines the multitude of laws, legal entities and compliance issues associated with administration within healthcare organizations. The complexity of ethical issues, both administrative and biomedical, is discussed in various applied medical settings.

This course provides students with a foundational view of healthcare delivery systems in the United States. Students discuss the formal structure of healthcare organizations and how costs, access and quality impact the delivery of care. Emphasis is placed on healthcare as a system of care delivery.

An introduction to healthcare finance, including management control processes, financial statement analysis, ratio analysis, variance analysis, and capital structure is the focus of this course. A foundational background of the economics of today's healthcare environment is examined.

Human Capital Management Concentration

The Human Capital Management Concentration is designed to provide individuals with knowledge in designing human capital development programs and measuring the effectiveness of investing in such programs within the corporate setting. This Concentration is recommended for individuals who work in human capital development fields.

You will be required to take the following 9 credit hours:

This course focuses on the management of self and others with an emphasis on administration and interpretation of diagnostic instruments which help clarify behaviors and skills which influence organizational and interpersonal outcomes. It covers the context of management in the organization, skills needed to effectively work with people in organizations, such as emotional intelligence and the roles people fill on the leader- manager-innovator continuum. All courses in the MSM Core require a Manager Reflection Journal to be kept by all students to focus on key learnings and applications throughout the program.

This course focuses on skill-building the necessary leverage skills to be effective on the leader-manager-innovator continuum. Emphasis is placed on structuring organizational efforts, staffing with diverse resources, establishing partnerships and other collaborative efforts and maintaining a cohesive organization.

This course is designed for students who desire to understand and master the intricacies associated with the recruitment and selection of human resources and practices, validity and reliability in testing, legal and regulatory factors affecting selection practices, making employment offers, and practices to ensure equal employment opportunity and affirmative action. Prerequisites: MBA 500 and MBA 624Prerequisites for MSM program only: MSM 500, 510, 520, 610, 620, and 630

Human Resource Management Concentration

The Human Resource Management Concentration examines theory and applications in all levels of organizational strategy, culture, and practice. Topic areas include human resource management roles and contributions in business planning and strategy, job value analyses, alternative work systems, recruitment and selection, fair employment practices, performance appraisal and management, compensation design and management, job evaluation systems, career development, health and safety, and employee rights. The topics include the study of specific quantitative and qualitative theories and methods used to collect reliable and valid human resource management data for decision purposes. You may take the human resource management electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You will be required to take the following 9 credit hours:

This course describes the various functional areas within the Human Resources field as well as applicable employment laws. Functional areas addressed include: Talent Management (i.e. Recruitment/Selection and Training/Development), Organizational Behavior, Employee/Labor Relations, Health and Safety and Total Rewards (i.e. Compensation and Benefit Administration). Areas of employment law covered will include: Equal Employment Opportunity, Employment/Labor Relations, Health and Safety and Compensation/Benefits related laws. Human Resource metrics and evaluation will also be introduced in this course. *It is recommended that this course is taken prior to other HR related courses

This course examines the roles of compensation and benefit management theory and practice within the field of Human Resources. This includes detailed examination of the different components of Total Rewards, including: job evaluation, internal/external equity, base/incentive pay, voluntary/mandated benefits, trends and applicable employment laws. Evaluating the effectiveness of these functions by utilizing applicable Human Resource metrics will also be addressed in this course. *It is recommended that students complete BA 603 prior to taking this course.

This course is designed for students who desire to understand and master the intricacies associated with the recruitment and selection of human resources and practices including: employment branding, legal and regulatory factors affecting selection practices, recruitment strategy, evaluation and practices to ensure equal employment opportunity. Other topics addressed in this course include: training design/delivery/strategy, performance management, employee engagement, and career management. Evaluating the effectiveness of these functions by utilizing applicable Human Resource metrics will also be addressed in this course. *It is recommended that students complete BA 603 prior to taking this course.

Information Security Management Concentration

In today's cyber world, professionals need to understand the methods for preventing, detecting, deterring, and responding to real and potential cyber threats and incidents. The Information Security Management Concentration provides graduate students with an advanced understanding of security philosophies, concepts, applications, and management principles. The Concentration focuses on the practice of protecting information assets from physical, logical, and human threats. Topic areas include physical and operational security, human factors in security, risk management, compliance and governance of information systems, and business continuity. Prior study is not required to pursue the Information Security Management Concentration.

A minimum of 9 credit hours are required for this Concentration.

This course addresses the issues relating to successful information security management. Topics include access control systems, network and software security, management practices, risk management, protection mechanisms, business continuity planning, and legal and ethical issues. The course allows for analysis of current security management models.

This course presents an examination of effective security methodologies based on comprehensive assessment of threats and implementation of a layered system of physical and electronic protection. Threat identification, countermeasures, and prevention are explored.

This course provides an exploration of the human aspects of Cybersecurity. Topics include human behavior and interaction, motivation and influence, and social engineering. Emphasis on the human element of cyber incidents in relation to protecting information and technology assets.

This course provides an exploration of how organizations manage risks to information technology assets. Discussion includes the application of methodologies and models for managing such risks. Topics also include recognition of security threats and vulnerabilities and the analysis of associated risks. A systematic approach for acquiring and analyzing information to support decision-making in the protection of assets and the allocation of security resources is presented.

This course explores the concepts of governance and how it applies to information systems. Discussion includes the importance of compliance with laws, regulations, policies, and procedures as a means of minimizing risk through mandated security and control measures. Through this course, students also gain an understanding of Information Technology (IT) Auditing processes and principles.

This course provides the student with an opportunity to identify the processes associated with business continuity planning and disaster recovery. Business continuity topics such as project scope and planning, assessing risk, developing policy and procedures, conducting business impact analyses, recovery strategies, recovery plan development, and implementation are explored. Disaster recovery will be discussed in terms of recovery plan development, implementation, and restoration.

Interdisciplinary Business Concentration

The Interdisciplinary Business Concentration is primarily oriented toward managerial practice and provides a generalist perspective across traditional MBA curricula. You will learn how to integrate theory and practice, apply basic concepts, and establish the analytical tools needed to manage a business in an evolving global environment. The Economics and Business Modeling and Planning courses in the Concentration, in conjunction with the core courses, will help prepare students interested in taking the MBA certification exam.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This course introduces modeling as a tool for decision-making and planning. It provides the foundation to understand various analytical models and prepares students to apply them to manage and solve real-life business problems. Topics include: optimization models, network models, inventory control, waiting lines, decision theory and multi-criteria decision models. Large-scale problem solving is facilitated through software applications. Prerequisite: MBA 624

This course presents fundamental micro and macroeconomic concepts relevant to managers and other policymakers in business and government. Students are challenged to recognize, apply, and assess these concepts to decision making in business management and public policy. Students address the applicability of economic concepts to themselves, businesses, and society. Concepts and implications fundamental to the market supply and demand economic framework are addressed with an emphasis on their application to the firm and individual. Additionally macro-economic concepts, including an overall aggregate model of the economy are addressed. Students are encouraged to take a holistic view of how economic concepts impact the firm. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

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This class encourages the application of advanced conceptual and theoretical perspectives to the design of organizations and the linkage mechanisms that organizations must develop to manage their environments. Students will practice diagnosing and resolving organizational problems related to the growth, survival, and decline of organizations. Research emphasis will be placed on how size, structure, technology, and organizational culture impacts operations, strategic contingencies, and competitive advantage. Prerequisite: MBA 500, Prerequisites for MSM program only: MSM 500, 510, 520, 610, 620, and 630

  • Global, internal and external forces
  • Knowledge Management
  • Organizational Change Management
  • Organizational Culture
  • Organizational design principles and criteria
  • Organizational Effectiveness
  • Organizational Ethics
  • Organizational growth and decline forces
  • Organizational Innovation & Intrapreneurship
  • Organizational structural and process problems

This course is a comprehensive study of law and its application in business operations and examines the influence of political, social, and regulatory issues on the formation and interpretation of the law. Topics include contracts, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, agency and employment relationships, and property concepts. Emphasis is placed on applying these concepts to business decisions while considering both ethical and global perspectives. Prerequisite: MBA 500, MAQC Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

Interdisciplinary Concentration

Select a minimum of 9 credit hours of graduate level course work (500 or above) not already required from the MBA, AC, BA, or MSF disciplines, or from any of the MBA Concentration.

Course options:

  • MBA course options (Select any 500 or above level course from this list)
  • AC course options (Select any 500 or above level course from this list)
  • BA course options (Select any 500 or above level course from this list)
  • MSF course options (Select any 500 or above level course from this list)

International Management Concentration

The International Management Concentration provides you with key topics, theories, and applications that managers and professionals understand and use in pursuing international business goals and activities. If you are interested in pursuing this Concentration, you should contact a major professor in the MBA area for assistance. You may take any of the international management electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This course will focus on international financial tools, applications, and concepts. Topics include fundamental international financial relationships and their application to firms and individuals, international transactions, tax issues, and multinational corporations. It will cover essential elements of transacting in an international market place. It also will address the fundamental risks inherent in international business and the use of financial securities to hedge these risks. Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

This course surveys international and global business issues, processes, and strategies. The course describes and assesses (a) issues that surround business and market opportunities, such as cultural, economic, legal, political, and technological differences, (b) international trade and monetary systems, and (c) strategies, structures, and processes used by successful international and/or global businesses and organizations. Prerequisite: MBA 500

This course provides a review of the classical areas of perceptions, cognition, attitudinal formation, and cultural influences that affect individual and group purchasing behaviors. Emphasis is placed on understanding marketplace dynamics, market segmentation, and understanding the importance of psychographics in market planning analysis. Prerequisite: MBA 500

This course is an examination of the basic categories of regulations and laws to develop the framework within which organizations operate in the global economy. The international framework will be contrasted with the one constraining domestic operations. Skills in making ethical, strategic decisions within this framework will be developed through comprehensive international case problems. Ethical and moral analysis will examine issues in human rights, environmental considerations, investment, and social responsibility considerations. Prerequisite: MBA 500

Management Concentration

This concentration is only available if you are a Master of Arts in Management (MAM) graduate from Bellevue University. MAM graduates are required to take the following 18 credit hours to obtain a second Master's degree. MAM graduates with an undergraduate in Accounting can have MBA 520 waived; however 18 credit hours would still be required for a second MBA.

Emphasis is placed on understanding reported financial information used to assess a company’s current performance, future risks, and business opportunities. Students develop skills necessary to understand the performance impact on financial statements and how economic events such as operating activities, corporate investments, and financing transactions affect the three main financial statements - the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. Cross-listed with MSF 520MBA 520 Prerequisite: Graduate standing

  • Accounting Cycle
  • Equity Issuance
  • Financial Accounting
  • Financial Analysis
  • Financial Statements
  • Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
  • Internal Controls
  • International Financial Reporting Standards
  • Ratios Analysis
  • Revenue Analysis

Students acquire knowledge, skills, and abilities to evaluate financial performance and strategies to utilize limited resources to optimize the financial value of a business. Key elements of the course include assessing financial performance, understanding financial and economic markets, computing the value of money and cash flows over time, performing risk analysis and project valuation. Cross-listed with MSF 655MBA 655 Prerequisite: MBA 624

  • Capital Budgeting
  • Communications
  • Critical Thinking
  • Decision Making
  • Financial Analysis
  • Financial Management
  • Financial Statement Analysis
  • Problem Solving
  • Risk Analysis
  • Valuation / Time Value Of Money

Emphasis is placed on the operational activities that successfully create and deliver products and services across the entire supply chain from the raw material to the final product. Included is the development of those performance skills which enhance the supplier and customer relationships and the order fulfillment activities. Techniques addressed include demand forecasting, quality performance analysis, and productivity measurement. Prerequisite: MBA 641 and MBA 655. MSBAN Prerequisite: MBA 520 and BAN 600. MSA Prerequisite: MBA 624. MAQC Prerequisite: MBA 641

  • Demand Forecasting
  • Inventory Management
  • Just In Time Methodology
  • Operations Management
  • Performance Analysis
  • Problem Solving
  • Product Design
  • Project Management
  • Quality Management
  • Supply Chain

Students develop the knowledge of accounting information concepts that enable them to develop recommendations for improving the performance of the firm. Students gain skills and knowledge in topics such as cost-volume-profit analysis and the balanced scorecard to support budget preparation and variance analysis to improve company performance. Students with undergraduate degree or 21 credit hours of accounting: A graduate level accounting elective may be substituted for MBA 641 if students have an undergraduate degree in Accounting or 21 credit hours in accounting and have taken an undergraduate Cost or Advanced Managerial course and have earned at least a C or better in all of these courses. Cross-listed with MSF 641Prerequisite: MBA 624

  • Activity-Based Costing
  • Budgeting
  • Cost Accounting
  • Cost Volume Profit Analysis
  • Data Analysis
  • Lean Accounting
  • Management Accounting
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Performance Management
  • Regression Analysis

Students integrate classical marketing theory with innovative marketing techniques and tactics to support a firm’s overall marketing and business strategies. Students will learn how to assess, select and integrate digital technologies, analytical approaches, and social media in concert with a firm’s overall marketing strategy. Prerequisite: MBA 500

  • Application of Knowledge
  • Communications
  • Critical Analysis
  • Marketing Management
  • Marketing Planning
  • Marketing Strategies
  • Problem Solving
  • Situational Analysis
  • Social Media
  • Target Audience

The capstone course provides an opportunity to integrate and apply strategic performance principles presented in the MBA program. Experience is gained in formulating key strategic, financial, marketing and operational decisions necessary to operate a successful business and measure their success in doing so. MBA 680 Prerequisite: MBA 615, MBA 635 and MBA 675

  • Analysis
  • Competition
  • Creativity
  • Ethics
  • Evaluation
  • Forecasting
  • Identification
  • Imagination
  • Innovation
  • Organization

Management Information Systems Concentration

The Management Information Systems Concentration is designed to explore topics in the Computer Information Systems field. If you are a Non-Computer Information Systems undergraduate major, you can enhance your understanding of the CIS area through this Concentration with limited coursework in Computer Information Systems at the undergraduate level. If you wish to take the Management Information Systems Concentration, you should contact a major professor in the MBA or Computer Information Systems area for assistance. You may take the management information systems electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

All courses are 3 credit hours

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This course focuses on the fundamentals of telecommunications including data, voice, image, and video formats. Coverage includes the concepts, models, architectures, protocols, standards, and security for the design, implementation, and management of digital networks. Emphasis is on the IT infrastructure to serve organizational needs in a rapidly changing competitive and technological environment.

This course introduces the skills, techniques, tools and methodologies necessary to support information system analysis, design and implementation.

Select one of the following

This course introduces students to the role IT plays in recognizing and exploiting the business opportunities offered by current and emerging technologies. Throughout the course students will identify and monitor current technologies at different stages of adoption and learn to use models to predict the adoption of current emerging technologies. Students will also develop a plan to align the use of current emerging technologies with the needs of the business. Prerequisite: CIS 519 and CIS 521

This course addresses the complex and unique issues related to effectively managing projects in an Information Technology context. Focus is placed on processes, teams, technology, and global project management. The course is grounded on the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) principles. Students will prepare project management deliverables based on actual problems provided within various business sectors and industries. The course provides students with an understanding of the problems inherent in managing integration, scope, schedule, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk, procurement, and stakeholders.

Marketing Concentration

The Marketing Concentration is designed to provide you with the opportunity to explore global topics in the marketing field. If you are interested in pursuing this Concentration, you should contact a major professor in the MBA area for assistance. You may take any of the marketing electives without pursuing the entire Concentration. MBA 635 Marketing & Media Strategy is a prerequisite to all Marketing Concentration courses.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This course examines the nature, characteristics, and culture of the online environment to understand, develop, and implement marketing strategies and tactics for conducting effective online commerce. Emphasis is on the hardware/software tools necessary for Internet-based commerce, market segmentation identification, product development, pricing, direct marketing, global marketing, and the methodology to execute marketing strategy in a computer mediated environment. Prerequisite: MBA 500

This course provides a review of the classical areas of perceptions, cognition, attitudinal formation, and cultural influences that affect individual and group purchasing behaviors. Emphasis is placed on understanding marketplace dynamics, market segmentation, and understanding the importance of psychographics in market planning analysis. Prerequisite: MBA 500

This course examines development, structure, and implementation of an effective and profitable sales force across substantially different environmental conditions. Strategies involving various markets, sales person characteristics, sales program design, and quantitative measurements are emphasized. Prerequisite: MBA 500

This course provides a framework for defining brand equity and identifying sources and outcomes of brand equity along with developing a tactical guideline for building, measuring, and managing brand equity. Emphasis is on building a common denominator to interpret the potential effects and trade-offs of various strategies and tactics for brands. Managing brand equity between what happened to the brand in the past and what should happen to it in the future is explored. Students gain experience by creating brand strategies and developing a strategic brand audit. Prerequisite: MBA 500

This course is designed to provide students with a means to obtain information for more effective marketing decision making. The essential concepts of marketing research and methods used to conduct research to help solve marketing problems will be emphasized. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods will be covered in the course and how these two approaches are best utilized to address a variety of marketing problems. Students are expected to obtain marketing research data and apply it to a variety of actual marketing problems. Prerequisite: MBA 500

Professional Communication Concentration

The Professional Communication concentration provides graduate students with an advanced understanding of communication challenges in contemporary organizations, enabling them to confidently assess communication issues and implement innovative solutions.

You will be required to take the following 6 credit hours:

This course is an overview of foundations for professional success in business and professional communication. Emphasis is placed on applying communication and management theories to practices in contemporary organizations, implementing optimal interpersonal communication strategies, and deploying advantageous group communication strategies. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

In this course, students develop the knowledge and communication skills necessary to thrive in an intercultural world. The course addresses the importance of intercultural communication; the relationships among culture, communication, and identity; and common cultural patterns. Emphasis is placed on the roles of language and nonverbal communication and the development of intercultural communication skills. Students will research and discuss best practices for professional behavioral expectations and for confronting problems and misconceptions whether conducting business locally or globally. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

A minimum of 3 additional credit hours are required from the courses listed below (or 1 of the 2 courses):

This course examines organizational communication and leadership from distinct perspectives, including symbolic, political, structural, and human resources. The course also focuses on designing, implementing, and assessing interventions for improving leadership communication in organizations. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

This course is a study of the causes and resolution of conflict. Emphasis is placed on the theory and practice of negotiation as a primary means of resolving conflict. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Project Management Concentration

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the courses listed below:

This course addresses the complex and unique issues related to effectively managing projects in an Information Technology context. Focus is placed on processes, teams, technology, and global project management. The course is grounded on the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) principles. Students will prepare project management deliverables based on actual problems provided within various business sectors and industries. The course provides students with an understanding of the problems inherent in managing integration, scope, schedule, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk, procurement, and stakeholders.

This course is designed to teach the importance of risk management in projects and provide information about the tools needed to effectively assess and monitor risks throughout the project lifecycle. Emphasis is placed on managing risks associated with project changes and risks associated with information technology projects. Topics covered include recurring issues that lead to failure in IT projects, methods for addressing recurring issues, and assessing risk impact. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.

This course explores communication and leadership techniques in order to equip project managers with the skills they need to deal effectively with issues relating to resources, stakeholders, global teams, and changing technology. Topics covered will include learning how to manage conflict, creating a positive team environment, running effective meetings, and managing successful projects. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of relevant topics in the area of global project management. Topics include characteristics of global and virtual workplaces, challenges and issues in global project management, methods and tools for effective global project management, and managing virtual teams. Students will engage in a virtual group project in order to experience key aspects of project management in a way that simulates real project management in a global organization. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Masters in Project Management Program (MPM)

This course is designed to explain the process of gathering requirements with emphasis on the successful management of requirements and its relationship to project success. Topics covered include requirements gathering techniques, identifying success criteria, and common reasons for project failure. Prerequisite: CIS 433 or CIS 633 or acceptance into the Master of Project Management (MPM) degree program.

Supply Chain Management Concentration

Companies of all types are interested in individuals who have solid business skills, decision-making capabilities, and a good understanding of the latest information technology developments. They are looking for leaders who have the confidence and capability to bring new ideas in the search for greater organization efficiency. As part of the MBA program, you can complete the Supply Chain Management Concentration. This Concentration involves the integration of business processes across organizations, from material sources and suppliers through manufacturing and processing to the final customer. The Concentration provides you with an understanding of the role that the supply chain provides in enterprise competitiveness and overall strategy. The Concentration helps prepare you for careers with manufacturers, distributors, logistics service providers, and consulting firms. The curriculum provides the required theoretical/conceptual bases and analytical methods for making sound operational and strategic business decisions. You may take the supply chain management electives without pursuing the entire Concentration.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This course examines classical and contemporary issues in managing supply chains in domestic and global environments. The capabilities that a supply chain must have to support a firm’s business strategy are studied. Students learn to analyze and assess the strategic role of the supply chain and the fundamental issues in managing them. Methodologies for designing and planning a supply chain are introduced and methods to apply them in supply chain activities are learned. Prerequisite: MBA 500, MAQC Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

With the business environment constantly changing, new strategies and topics in supply chain management emerge continuously. This course is devoted to bring such topics to the foreground. It examines the emerging issues by evaluating their immediate and long-term impact on traditional supply chain management theories as well as other business disciplines and practices. Contemporary readings and guest speakers supplement traditional academic literature and textbooks as the topics are fluid and very dynamic. Prerequisite: MBA 670

This course examines the importance of various technology-driven practices which affect the performance of supply chains, such as timely information sharing, reducing lead times, and reducing inventory levels, are examined. Software and products used in managing supply chains, such as Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI), are introduced. The advantages and disadvantages of each are analyzed, and students learn how they benefit the enterprise and how to propose choices for various industries. Prerequisite: MBA 670

The course provides students with a thorough overview of the Logistics Management concepts and their interface with other functional areas. Students will learn about activities involved in moving and storing materials and information through the supply chain. Course activities include developing and integrating models of procurement, transportation, warehousing, materials handling and information storage. Problem solving projects and assignments require basic knowledge of Excel and Access. Prerequisite: MBA 624 and MBA 670, MAQC Prerequisite: MBA 520 and MBA 624

Tax Concentration

This Concentration is designed to provide a broad foundation in both personal and business income tax. These specialized courses are designed to provide the information necessary to meet the Internal Revenue Service's requirements to become a Registered Tax Return Preparer. In combination with required accounting courses and courses in business administration, the Tax Concentration provides preparation for a professional career in tax planning and compliance.

You must select a minimum of 9 credit hours from the following:

This course covers advanced topics for the individual taxpayer including credits, alternative minimum tax, like-kind exchanges, passive activities and sales assets. Also covered in this course are tax periods and accounting methods with major emphasis on working with tax laws, tax rules and procedures for the tax practitioner, and the tax research processes. Prereq: AC 331

This class covers the creation, formation, and liquidation of C corporations as well as tax practices and ethics as they relate to C corporations. Also covered will be taxation across state lines, business tax credits, and international tax. Prerequisite: AC 331

This course will cover tax issues for flow-through entities such as Subchapter S corporations, partnerships, Limited Liability Companies, trusts and estates. Also addressed will be estate and gift taxes, tax planning issues, tax practice and ethics. Sources and applications of federal tax law are also covered. The course also emphasizes tax research processes including appropriate communication. Prereq: AC 331

This course covers tax issues relating to investments, charitable giving, estate planning, business succession planning, ethics, and cross-border tax considerations. Sources and application of federal tax law are also covered. The course emphasizes tax research processes including appropriate communication. Prereq: AC 331

FAQs

Is an MBA harder than a masters? ›

So, neither option is inherently easier than the other. The difficulty of each program also depends on the student's background. Because an MBA focuses on career development, a professional with 5-10 years of business experience may find an MBA easier than a traditional master's.

Is MBA difficult for average students? ›

Many potential students ask why MBAs are so difficult to graduate. But they ask the wrong question, the truth being: for the average student, MBAs are quite easy to graduate. But as you'll probably learn during your Master's in Business Administration: your attitude makes up over 50% of your professional success.

Is an MBA equivalent to a Master's degree? ›

An MBA is a Master of Business Administration, it is a master's degree. It is a field of graduate study that specializes in business administration after a student receives their undergraduate degree.

Is MBA from University of East London accredited? ›

Everything on our MBA is geared towards your career development, ensuring you graduate with a clearer vision of your future; it's accredited by the Chartered Management Institute, so you can be sure you're learning the leadership skills that employers really need, and our expert staff have the depth of knowledge to ...

Do people put MBA after their name? ›

It is common for professionals to add the word MBA after their name on LinkedIn. In the end, the site is meant to highlight your academic achievements, help you get jobs, and get connected with other professionals.

What pays more MBA or MS? ›

The average income for an individual with an MBA program is much higher than a person with an MS program. You can expect to earn a lot when you have an MBA degree.

Is it easy to pass in MBA? ›

Getting an MBA can be hard because the classes are pretty challenging, but they will help you become a better critical thinker. Many schools have students take the same core courses revolving around themes like leadership and teamwork, but most programs offer various electives to tailor to your MBA experience.

What are the disadvantages of MBA? ›

Advantages and Disadvantages of an MBA
AdvantagesDisadvantages
Increased job opportunitiesCost of study
Personal and entrepreneurial skill developmentTime commitment
Specialized in the field of interest with management skillsLack of practical and applied learning
High salaryRisk of ROI
1 more row
27 Dec 2021

Is it hard to get an MBA online? ›

Getting admitted to an online MBA program is almost certainly easier than gaining admission to a traditional program. A 2012 study by the Graduate Management Admissions Council found median acceptance rates differed dramatically between the two kinds of schools: 45 percent for full-time traditional MBA programs.

Is MBA or Masters better? ›

While the MBA is suited to students from any academic or professional background who want greater career flexibility, management roles, or business ownership, Masters programmes are the better option for students who want highly specialised knowledge in a specific area.

What is the starting salary after MBA? ›

MBA Salary in India based on Experience

An MBA professional in India can earn a starting salary of Rs. 10-12 lakhs per year. The average starting salary for an MBA graduate in India is Rs. 9 lakhs per year.

Which is better MS or MBA in USA? ›

Both a Master of Business Administration (MBA) and a Master of Science (MS) degree can offer a comprehensive graduate-level business education, however an MBA will provide an interdepartmental look at how businesses run, while an MS will provide a nuanced understanding of one particular area of business.

How good is University of East London for MBA? ›

University of East London is ranked 801 in World University Rankings by Times Higher Education and has an overall score of 4.2 stars, according to student reviews on Studyportals, the best place to find out how students rate their study and living experience at universities from all over the world.

How much is an MBA at the University of East London? ›

INR 14.86 L

Is the University of East London a good University? ›

Ranked as the 'Best Modern University in London' by the National Student Survey, 2nd in the UK for Teaching Quality (Times Higher Education Young University Rankings) and in the world's top 200 young universities (Times Higher Education Young University Rankings), UEL is recognised in the UK and around the world for ...

How do you list an online MBA on a resume? ›

Place it under the education header on your resume. Like work experience and job history, higher education degrees and certificates typically follow reverse-chronological order. You should list the MBA first, above your undergraduate degree.

What do you call an MBA graduate? ›

A person who has completed an MBA is called a person, at least in the U.S. Certain MBA holders will add the MBA designation after their name, similar to a PhD.

Should I include my MBA in my email signature? ›

1. Add “MBA” to your email signature, as if you're a PhD. This only takes thirty seconds to do, but you'll be amazed at the impact it has. Every single time you send an email, the recipient will be reminded of your impressive academic credentials.

Which MBA is most in demand? ›

Most In-Demand MBA Specializations
  • International Management. ...
  • Strategy. ...
  • Consulting. ...
  • Finance Leadership. ...
  • Entrepreneurship. ...
  • Marketing. ...
  • Operations Management. ...
  • IT or Technology Management. A specialized MBA in IT or Technology Management puts MBA graduates at the cutting edge of UX, design, and the flow of information technology.

Which MBA has highest salary? ›

Which MBA specialization has the highest salary? According to the BLS, some of the highest-paying management occupations related to MBA concentrations include computer and information systems management, financial management, marketing management, and human resources management.

Can I do both Masters and MBA? ›

Yes, you can do MBA after MS but it is important to know that MBA and MS are two diverse master's programs. MS is focused on Science, Tech and Engineering courses as well as research-oriented specialisations. MBA is a professional course with numerous benefits from business exposure, personality development, etc.

How many hours should I study for MBA? ›

An MBA degree typically requires 60 credit hours.

Is doing MBA worth it in 2022? ›

According to a 2022 survey of corporate recruiters, the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) projected that MBA graduates working at US companies would earn a median annual salary of $115,000 in 2022. Non-MBA degree holders were projected to earn much less: $75,000 for bachelor's degree holders [1].

Do we have maths in MBA? ›

All MBA programs, and in business generally require some maths, particularly on quantitative subjects such as Accounting, Economics and Finance. In this mathematics course, you will learn the fundamental business math skills needed to succeed in your MBA study and in the field of business.

What is the benefits of online MBA? ›

Advantages and Disadvantages of Online MBA Course
AdvantagesDisadvantages
FlexibilityLack of Campus Experience
CredibilityStudy Balance with Other Commitments
Cost EfficiencyLonger Time
ReputationTechnology Cost
19 Aug 2022

What kind of math is required in MBA? ›

Some of the most important MBA math skills involve basic number sense, algebra, calculus, statistics, and probability.

What is the salary of MBA students? ›

Average MBA Salary as per specialization
MBA SpecializationAverage MBA Salary*
MBA FinanceRs 2,00,000 to Rs 14,70,000
MBA Human Resource ManagementRs 4,50,000 to Rs 15,50,000
MBA Information TechnologyRs 10,000 to Rs 6,00,000
MBA Logistics ManagementRs 6,25,000 to Rs 8,50,000
1 more row
2 Sept 2022

What is the best age to do an MBA? ›

Studies suggest that the best age for pursuing a normal MBA course in India is 25-27, and for an Executive MBA, it is 28-30. However, these are just numbers, and remember that you can do an MBA at any age! You can reach out to MBA degree holders and visit B-schools for additional information.

Are online MBAs the same? ›

Many in-person and online MBA programs offer the same curriculum and have similar academic expectations. The biggest difference is that an asynchronous online MBA typically offers greater flexibility, while an in-person MBA may provide more networking opportunities.

What does online MBA mean? ›

Online MBA is a master's degree in business administration which is a 2 years program where you learn all the business skills and management skills through online mode. Master of Business Administration has always been an option for people who think they need an addition to their current career graph.

Should I get an MBA if I already have a Masters? ›

One of the best benefits of attending an MBA program after earning an MS degree is that you may be prepared to pursue a higher-level career or position within your field that requires management or leadership skills or training.

What is better than an MBA? ›

If you have a love of numbers, a Master of Finance just might be a better choice than an MBA. Master of Finance programs are typically a bit easier to get into, and while most MBA programs require at least three years of work experience, advanced finance students can come in with just internship experience.

How long does it take to get MBA? ›

How Long Does It Typically Take to Get an MBA? A full-time MBA program usually takes 1 to 2 years to complete. From online to on-campus and full-time to part-time, you can choose from a variety of programs based on your needs.

Why are MBA salaries so high? ›

The core curriculum provides a cross functional view of learning business skills and tools necessary in today's companies. A graduate brings old and new knowledge into the company and the MBA provides the additional time to acquire expertise for higher salaries.

Which job is best after MBA? ›

Here are the top 10 jobs for MBA graduates.
  1. Marketing Manager. ...
  2. Business Operations Manager. ...
  3. Health Services Manager. ...
  4. Financial Manager. ...
  5. Computer and Information Systems Manager. ...
  6. Investment Fund Manager. ...
  7. Chief Technology Officer. ...
  8. Information Technology Director.

What is the monthly income of MBA? ›

The MBA Salary in India is approx INR 40,000 per month however, it varies according to the specialization you opt for. The average salary of an MBA in Digital Marketing is INR 45,000 per month.

Can I get a job in USA after MBA? ›

After you graduate from your MBA program, you're eligible for optional practical training (OPT), which is a 12-month period in which you can stay on and work in the US. This allows you to work in any industry area that is related to your field of study.

Can I do PhD after MBA? ›

Can i do phd after MBA? Ans: Yes, one can do a PhD after MBA. There are Various Business Schools all over the world that offer PhD programs that can be pursued after an MBA. For the MBA itself, many schools require some years of work experience.

Is PhD better than MBA? ›

MBA and PhD programs have the potential to transform your career. A PhD allows you to become a professor and pursue a lifetime of research while an MBA can open up job opportunities at the top of business and drastically increase your salary expectations. No wonder it's a difficult decision for many people.

Is a Masters or MBA better? ›

While the MBA is suited to students from any academic or professional background who want greater career flexibility, management roles, or business ownership, Masters programmes are the better option for students who want highly specialised knowledge in a specific area.

What are the disadvantages of MBA? ›

Advantages and Disadvantages of an MBA
AdvantagesDisadvantages
Increased job opportunitiesCost of study
Personal and entrepreneurial skill developmentTime commitment
Specialized in the field of interest with management skillsLack of practical and applied learning
High salaryRisk of ROI
1 more row
27 Dec 2021

How easy is an MBA? ›

Earning an MBA is a challenging and rewarding experience, helping you attain new professional and personal heights. Furthermore, different students will find varying aspects of the program to be more difficult than others. What may be easy for one student may be difficult for another.

Is MBA easier than undergrad? ›

Yes. Master's degrees are a bit harder than most undergraduate studies.

What is the starting salary after MBA? ›

MBA Salary in India based on Experience

An MBA professional in India can earn a starting salary of Rs. 10-12 lakhs per year. The average starting salary for an MBA graduate in India is Rs. 9 lakhs per year.

How many hours is a MBA? ›

An MBA degree typically requires 60 credit hours.

Should I get an MBA if I already have a Masters? ›

One of the best benefits of attending an MBA program after earning an MS degree is that you may be prepared to pursue a higher-level career or position within your field that requires management or leadership skills or training.

Does online MBA have value? ›

Online MBA salaries: The return on your investment

According to a survey conducted by the Graduate Management Admission Council, the median base starting salary US companies were expecting to offer new MBA hires in 2022 maintained a historically high $115,000 in addition to a median signing bonus of $10,500 [1].

Is it worth doing MBA in 2022? ›

According to a 2022 survey of corporate recruiters, the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) projected that MBA graduates working at US companies would earn a median annual salary of $115,000 in 2022. Non-MBA degree holders were projected to earn much less: $75,000 for bachelor's degree holders [1].

What is the benefits of online MBA? ›

Advantages and Disadvantages of Online MBA Course
AdvantagesDisadvantages
FlexibilityLack of Campus Experience
CredibilityStudy Balance with Other Commitments
Cost EfficiencyLonger Time
ReputationTechnology Cost
19 Aug 2022

Is maths required for MBA? ›

All MBA programs, and in business generally require some maths, particularly on quantitative subjects such as Accounting, Economics and Finance. In this mathematics course, you will learn the fundamental business math skills needed to succeed in your MBA study and in the field of business.

Can you get an MBA with a low GPA? ›

Despite what you may have heard, it is absolutely possible to get into a top MBA program with a low GPA. I have helped many North Star clients succeed despite having shaky undergraduate records.

Is MBA good for future? ›

An MBA can enhance your marketability as a professional and increase the quality and quantity of job opportunities. Over 98% of Wharton MBA graduates are extended full-time job offers. An MBA also helps you build business leadership skills, as well as a professional network.

Will an MBA increase my salary? ›

While an MBA degree is a considerable investment in both time and money, research indicates the ROI for graduates may be as high as $20,000 per year in additional salary and compensation.

Should I get an MBA right away? ›

You're more likely to do well in grad school when you're able to devote plenty of time to classes, exams, and assignments. Starting an MBA program right away gives you this time to focus. If you decide to wait, you might end up having to juggle the demands of a job and an MBA program at the same time.

What percent of people have MBAS? ›

More than 16 million people in the U.S., roughly 8% of the country's population, now has a master's on his or her resume, a 43% increase since 2002.

Videos

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4. MBA 101 | Master Of Business Administration For Beginners & Aspirants | What Is MBA? | Simplilearn
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